06 July 2009

What to do with garlic scapes

Now that they are almost all gone, I ask: "What's your favorite thing to do with garlic scapes other than making a pesto?"

Including the usual garlic scape pesto, I've tried:

  • Garlic scape tempura (ok, but be sure only to use just only the flower tips, not the stems);
  • Grilling (not so great);
  • Chopped finely and mixed in with burgers of ground turkey, chopped gherkins, herbs, mustard, bread crumbs and Worcestershire sauce (really good);
  • Garlic scape bread (the bulbs are better for this); and
  • Mixing garlic scape pesto into leftover steamed red new potatoes and mashing them into a cake that is fried in a skillet (wow, that's good).
How about you?

7 comments:

Mary said...

I made my first garlic scape pesto this year. It was good, but I got violently ill after eating it. Maybe I'm allergic. Unfortunately, I don't think I can ever eat them again. Sad.

Brad said...

Oh no! I'm sorry to hear that. I couldn't eat green grapes for a couple years because of a similar occurrence. It was just a coincidence or bad grapes, but it was even hard to look at them for a long while.

Kate said...

Hm, I haven't ever had garlic scapes before- pesto is the most popular option? That is a beautiful picture of one!

Brad said...

The scape pesto is pretty yummy (unless your Mary).

Meg Wolff said...

I'm glad I read this post, because guess what my husband brought home tonight? You guessed it, garlic scapes.

Mary, sorry to hear about the scape pesto reaction. I had the same reaction to fiddleheads, haven't had them since. :-(

Brad said...

Oh, Meg, I'm so glad you posted and reminded me that I didn't respond to your message.

I love the idea of eating fiddleheads more than the actual eating of them. I keep trying new things each year, but I still haven't hit on a must do recipe for them.

Let us know what you do with those scapes.

Brad said...

Oh and another new use for them: chopping them fine and adding them to a slaw of slaw like veggies: kohlrabi, cabbage, onion, harukei turnips, and their ilk.